Eating Disorders | Here to Help

Petrie, A.P., Greenleaf, C., Carter, J., and Reel, J.J., (2007). Psychosocial correlates of disordered eating among male collegiate athletes. Journal of Clinical Sports Psychology, 1, 340-357.

National Centre for Eating Disorders - Bulimia Nervosa. …

Bulimia in men is more likely to be associated with conflicts over sexual identity. However there may be many hidden cases among men who are completely heterosexual. Going to the gym and exercising obsessively might simply be another way of “purging” for males who have become extremely body conscious. This may be accompanied by eating disordered behaviour and the use of steroids and other supplements designed to build muscle and reduce fat. Many young men, unconfident in their masculinity, try to emulate sporting “masculine” role models such as famous cyclists or track athletes.


National Centre for Eating Disorders - The Psychology …

Disordered Eating Among Athletes: A Comprehensive Guide for Health Professionals will increase your understanding of eating disorders among athletes and …

Smolak, L., Murnan, S.K., and Ruble, A.E., (2000). Female athletes and eating problems: a meta-analysis. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 27, 371-380.


Report of the APA Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls

People with eating disorders engage in four harmful and destructive behaviors – starving, bingeing, purging, and grazing. They often get stuck in cycles of starving and bingeing, bingeing and purging, starving and grazing, or grazing and purging. The diagnostic criteria come directly from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5 ™) (American Psychiatric Association, 2013).

Seven Steps to Stomp Out Sneak Eating « Everyday …

Occupations and avocations that encourage thinness, such as elite athletics, are associated with increased risk of developing anorexia nervosa (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). A meta-analysis of 34 studies showed that female college athletes showed significantly more eating disordered patterns than non-athlete controls (Smolak et al., 2000).

Are You An Under-Eater? 8 Signs You’re Not Eating Enough

While we cannot extrapolate from humans to rats and no firm conclusions can be drawn from such human studies as exist it is interesting to note that athletes who have to keep within a weight range from one season to the other complain that it becomes progressively harder to lose the same amount of weight from one season to another.Hence no diet should be embarked on by anyone of any weight without considerable planning.Dieters in several studies have been described as experiencing a changed relationship with food, such as powerful urges to eat or excessive preoccupation with food and feelings of being out of control around food, hence they are naturally vulnerable to breaking their diet in the face of temptation.The psychological as well as physiological effects of drastically reducing food intake have been well documented by Ancel Keys in a series of much quoted experiments conducted on young healthy male conscientious objectors without a history of weight problems.