A Tax Reform Agenda for Low-Income Americans - Next …

As noted in this book's earlier chapter entitled "Favored Themes and Motion Picture Propaganda", during World War II, the federal " . . . government, convinced that movies had extraordinary power to mobilize public opinion for war, carried out an intensive, unprecedented effort to mold the content of Hollywood feature films." Unfortunately, as is pointed out in the Koppes/Black book and even more directly in the above referenced chapter, that effort was not entirely successful due to a lack of cooperation from Hollywood. Writing about American films during the war years, Koppes and Black stated that "[m]ovies reflected American society in a way, but the mirror that the movies held up to America displayed an image that was distorted and refracted by myriad forces, not least of them the profit motive." Thus, Washington objected to the image American movies were creating abroad during the war years, and to the potential affect such movies might have on morale at home. Both Washington's original desire to utilize movies as propaganda tools and its subsequent disappointment with Hollywood's level of cooperation are based on the underlying conviction that movies do influence human behavior.

Unconscious Reactions Separate Liberals and …
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Mill's version of utilitarianism differed from Bentham'salso in that he placed weight on the effectiveness of internalsanctions — emotions like guilt and remorse which serve toregulate our actions. This is an off-shoot of the different viewof human nature adopted by Mill. We are the sorts of beings thathave social feelings, feelings for others, not just ourselves. Wecare about them, and when we perceive harms to them this causes painfulexperiences in us. When one perceives oneself to be the agent ofthat harm, the negative emotions are centered on the self. Onefeels guilt for what one has done, not for what one sees anotherdoing. Like external forms of punishment, internal sanctions areinstrumentally very important to appropriate action. Mill alsoheld that natural features of human psychology, such as conscience anda sense of justice, underwrite motivation. The sense of justice,for example, results from very natural impulses. Part of thissense involves a desire to punish those who have harmed others, andthis desire in turn “…is a spontaneous outgrowth from twosentiments, both in the highest degree natural…; the impulse ofself-defense, and the feeling of sympathy.” (Chapter 5,Utilitarianism) Of course, he goes on, the justificationmust be a separate issue. The feeling is there naturally, but itis our ‘enlarged’ sense, our capacity to include thewelfare of others into our considerations, and make intelligentdecisions, that gives it the right normative force.


The United States is riven by the politics of extremes

Education Update:Harassment Versus Free Speech: The Blurred Lines of Social Media:Tools for Creating Motivated Readers Find this Pin and more on Professional Development by officialascd. This Education Update writer believes motivating students to want to read—inside and outside of the classroom—requires a robust …
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(1988) told " . . . the story of a high school mathematics teacher who takes a class of losers and potential dropouts and transforms them, in the course of one school year, into kids who have learned so much that eighteen of them are able to pass a tough college-credit exam at the end of the year." The film shows that " . . . motivation and hard work can rewrite the destinies of kids that society might be willing to write off." That same year, the murder of the talk radio host in may have suggested that we should be " . . . cautious . . . prudent . . . bland, never push anybody, never say what you really think (and) offer yourself as a hostage to the weirdos even before they make the first move." On the other hand, as movie critic Roger Ebert points out: "Of what use is freedom of speech to those who fear to offend?"