public relations | Communication Theory

The time to act is now to help stop the proposed pro-homosexuality programs. Here are some things you can do. Would you do one or two of them at least? 1. Write to: The Premier, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C., objecting to the provincial government’s allowing such programs. Send copies of your letter to the Minister of Education at the same address, to your MLA, and to the BCTF, your local school board, and the local teachers’ association. Also send copies to the leaders of other provincial parties. 2. Write a letter to your local newspaper. 3. If you are a parent, bring the matter up at the Parent Advisory Council meeting for your school, if your child attends public school. 4. Form an ad-hoc committee of like-minded people. Speak together with a firm (but not shrill) voice. (BC Parents and Teachers for Life will gladly give what information we can to help you.) Get your school board to act to prevent schools being used to propagandize for controversial, unhealthy behaviour. 4. You could phone the Ministry of Education, Public Affairs Branch at 387-4611, ask for the Curriculum branch, and leave your message, asking that you receive a reply. 5. If you are a high-school student, you and like-minded friends could make a respectful representation to the educational authorities. In all your communications, stress that you are for the protection of all students from violence, but oppose the indoctrination of students for the homosexual life-style. We must be accurate about our facts, show concern for others, and stand up for the rights of parents and the welfare of students.

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The Exodus ministry, dedicated to communicating the message of “freedom from homosexuality,” had had charitable status in New Zealand for more than ten years, but the government’s Charities Commission ruled that the group did not qualify because its activities offered no “public benefit.”


Ethnography of communication - Wikipedia

The British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) found Lesley Pilkington guilty of professional malpractice after she let her “personal preconceived views about gay lifestyle and sexual orientation … affect her professional relationship in a way that was prejudicial.”