Ancient Egypt: Information on Mummies and Mummification in Egypt

atron, a disinfectant and desiccating agent, was the main ingredient used in the mummification process. A compound of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate (salt and baking soda), essentially dried out the corpse. Obtained from dried-up river beds, it was packed around and inside the body in linen bags, and left for 35 to 40 days to draw moisture out of the tissues. By removing the organs and packing the internal cavity with dry natron, the body tissues were preserved. The body was filled with Nile mud, sawdust, lichen and cloth scraps to make it more flexible. Small cooking onions or linen pads were sometimes used to replace the eyes. Beginning in the third dynasty, the internal organs (lungs, stomach, liver and intestines) were removed, washed with palm wine and spices, and stored in four separate made of limestone, calcite or clay. Prior to this, the abdominal contents were removed, wrapped and buried in the floor of the tomb. However, the heart was left in the body because it was considered the centre of intelligence.

Mummification was mainly done to wealthy people as poorer people could not afford the process.

Unlike most scholars of the ancient world, Salima Ikram knows her subjects on an intimate, face-to-face basis. In this interview, Ikram, an Egyptologist at the American University in Cairo, sheds light on why mummification was practiced in ancient Egypt, what the ancients thought the afterlife would be like, and why—of some 70 million mummies made—very few remain intact today.


The Pharaoh’s mummification process | year4stb

he art of mummification was perfected in the  (1070-712 B.C.). Around 450 B.C. (), the Greek historian  documented the process:

Year 6 have now planned and designed their mummification cartoons. Below are some examples of the funny quotes the children are using in their cartoons. Can you guess what part of the mummification process the quotes go along with?