One of his most successful plays is A Streetcar Named Desire.

Williams’s life, to say the least, is not what people would call “picture perfect.” His drama, “A Streetcar Named Desire,” has a direct reference to his life struggles....

Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, and Tennessee William’s A Streetcar Named Desire.
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Kolin points out this metaphor in his article " 'It's only a paper moon': The Paper Ontology' in Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire.'" Kolin has found that Williams has used paper as a metaphor to describe Blanche's and Stanley's faults and desires.


Woman in A Streetcar Named Desire

Blanche Dubois in A Streetcar Named Desire would be a perfect example of a tragic hero.
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Blanche's instructions were to “take a streetcar named Desire, and then transfer to one called Cemeteries." When Blanche first arrives she is possessed by a desire for love and understanding, but always in the background lurks the fear of death and destruction....


A Streetcar Named Desire (TV Movie 1995) - IMDb

As in many of Williams's plays, there is much use of symbolism and interesting characters in order to draw in and involve the audience. The plot of A Streetcar Named Desire alone does not captivate the audience. It is Williams's brilliant and intriguing characters that make the reader truly understand the play's meaning. He also presents a continuous flow of raw, realistic moods and events in the play which keeps the reader fascinated in the realistic fantasy Williams has created in A Streetca...

Sexism in A Streetcar Named Desire | ebrowderlong

“He [Williams] continued this study with Blanche Dubois of A Streetcar Named Desire (1947).” Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire is epitome of full-bodied male pulchritude and Williams’ most radiant symbol of viri...

Jan 13, 2012 · Sexism in A Streetcar Named Desire

Joseph Krutch, author of Twentieth Century Interpretations of A Streetcar Named Desire wrote, “The authors perceptions remain subtle and delicate… The final impression left is, surprisingly enough not of sensationalism but of subtlety” (38.) As in many of Williams's plays deeper meanings are understood only through close examination of each scene....