Oedipus could evoke fear in us, not pity.

With its intricate plot, archetypical tragic character, and lofty social issues, Oedipus the King provides for virtually any and all interpretations....

We feel great sympathy ('pathos') for Jocasta's suicide and the fate of Oedipus' daughters.

I go, but first will tell thee why I came.
Thy frown I dread not, for thou canst not harm me.
Hear then: this man whom thou hast sought to arrest
With threats and warrants this long while, the wretch
Who murdered Laius—that man is here.
He passes for an alien in the land
But soon shall prove a Theban, native born.
And yet his fortune brings him little joy;
For blind of seeing, clad in beggar's weeds,
For purple robes, and leaning on his staff,
To a strange land he soon shall grope his way.
And of the children, inmates of his home,
He shall be proved the brother and the sire,
Of her who bare him son and husband both,
Co-partner, and assassin of his sire.
Go in and ponder this, and if thou find
That I have missed the mark, henceforth declare
I have no wit nor skill in prophecy.
[Exeunt TEIRESIAS and OEDIPUS]


Oedipus' pride is an essential characteristic throughout the play....

Such a formulation of the riddle is important at various points in Oedipus Rex.

Dramatic irony plays an important part in "Oedipus the King", because it is used to describe Oedipus' character as arrogant and blind toward the truth.


Now let us apply this basic concept to the text of Oedipus Tyrannus.

He asks Creon to expel him from Thebes as quickly as he can and gives orders for Jocasta’s burial (1446ff), a gesture of concern and responsibility characteristic of the Oedipus we saw in the opening scenes(73)....

.Now Oedipus is pursuing the killer as possibly the same as himself.

Dramatic irony is also use by Sophocles to make the audience feel their taken part of the play knowing the fate of the main character, making the audience wait in suspense wanting to know how Oedipus would react to his fate....

Oedipus' pride is an innate characteristic....

As Jocasta recounts to Oedipus: An oracle Once came to Laius (I will not say 'Twas from the Delphic god himself, but from His ministers) declaring he was doomed To perish by the hand of his own son, A child that should be born to him by me....

Oedipus committed murder but unknowingly of who King Laius was.

One day Oedipus finds out that there is a prophecy that depicts him killing his father and marrying his mother. The prophecy may have been proven untrue if he wouldn't have put himself on such a high pedestal. It all started one day when he met up with King Laius: Sea...

Oedipus' honor was his claim against the murder.

“Oedipus The King” is the tragic story of a man of a noble structure but is triggered by great tragedies and realities of him-self that shatter his existence.

Oedipus was royalty and knew it as well did King Laius.

The first obvious question is: How can this drama possibly be considered realistic since it relies so heavily on predetermination and fate in the life of the protagonist, Oedipus.