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"Just like in the portraits. He was bone from the elbows to his hands and from the knees down, but the rest was perfect. Good-looking man putting on a bit of weight, he'd gone bald. He was quite naked, you know," and then he stopped, listening for something that must have been a clatter of china in the kitchen, where his wife was making tea for us, for he went on very quickly, "Look, I've been in the Army, I've been in bathhouses, I've seen men. But I never saw nothing like him." He stopped again, and nodding his head, meaningfully, as novelists say, began to tap a spot just above his knee. "He was built like a pony."

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"I was sitting in the 's offices one morning, reading the papers, when I came upon a story about a Russian scientist who had dug up Tsar Ivan the Terrible, and, working from the skull, had reassembled his face. Staring at those grim features, I remembered that I had read somewhere that in the late 1930s someone had opened Lord Byron's coffin in his family vault in Hucknall, just down the road from Sheffield. I rang the vicar, who confirmed that this had indeed happened, and that one man among his parishoners had been there at the time."


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"Good God, what did he look like?" I said.
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The Canon, like Houldsworth, did note some damage to the body: most obviously, he wrote, Byron's right foot, his lame one, had become detached from the remainder of the body and lay on the bottom of the coffin. [Barber p.136] But Barber made no explicit comment on the state of the remainder of the poet's body, although the decomposition of the arms and legs mentioned by his churchwarden was actually a typical effect of over-hasty and inadequate embalming. No mention was made – naturally, given the date and Barber's calling – of either the poet's nakedness or the abnormal genital development that had so awed Mr Houldsworth. And we have no photographs; a Mr Bullock, who had been brought along as a sort of official photographer to record the condition of the tomb, "refused on moral grounds" to take any pictures. [Ellis] Thus when the rector published an account of his investigations, entitled in pamphlet form in 1939, it contained a pretty sanitised version of events.


Lord Byron (1788-1824) – Key Facts, Life & Work Information

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Lord Byron - Poems, Biography, Quotes - Poetry

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