The play Othello, evolves around the theme of jealousy.

Though the bard did demonstrate concerns about racial and religious prejudice, in Othello and The Merchant of Venice, his interest in the tragedy of the Moor was principally psychological.

Also, it is Iago's jealousy of Othello that drives him to destroy both Othello and Desdemona.
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Bradley, in his book of literary criticism, Shakespearean Tragedy, describes the theme of sexual jealousy in Othello: But jealousy, and especially sexual jealousy, brings with it a sense of shame and humiliation....


Free Othello Jealousy papers, essays, and research papers.

The theme of jealousy is demonstrated in the play by Iago and Othello....
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For the injustice that Iago feels has been committed against him, he brings about the destruction of Othello and his wife, Desdemona, using Cassio as his tool for doing so....


It is enough to know about 100 words to survive in a foreign country.

A rather obvious theme in the Shakespeare's tragedy, "Othello", is that of the many facets of jealousy, which instigate the evil-doings of protagonist, Iago....

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Other villains, such as Scar in Disney's "The Lion King", Jafar in Disney's "Aladdin", and Mother Gothel from Disney's "Tangled" have closely related motives and jealous personalities.

This tragic play shows how jealousy and envy can overpower a person's mind and lead them to wreak havoc on others.

Although there are many examples of these opinions within the play, I believe there is much more evidence which contradict these two statements, which allow me to conclude that Othello is in fact a jealous man and that Iago does have motives.

They are jealous because the other people are able to and have the things they want but can’t get....

In Othello we see cases of jealousy in every scene that defiantly keeps readers interested in the story, but is it the most important part of the story....

My definition of jealousy is where someone has something or is able to do something that another person can do.

Throughout Othello, Desdemona is presented as pure and innocent – in regards to this, Auden’s comment is unusual as Desdemona is seldom criticised; indeed many critics are complementary, giving her titles such as ‘gentle Desdemona’.