Insomnia, sleep disorders and deprivation

Sleep Deprivation - Insomnia Sleep & Snoring

I have a comment and concern with sleep deprivation. Several of my friends actually stay up and get only 3 hours of sleep then go to school and work. They say that they recieve somewhat of a "buzz" as if they smoked a small amount of weed or drank alchohol. Is this anything that has been heard of before?

Sleep Deprivation in America: Risks and Effects - WebMD
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The implications of this data seem to be fairly important in supporting the location of the I-function within the brain. The prefrontal cortex is active whenever a person is awake, no matter how little sleep they have had. Also, this area is active while dreaming. Since the individual is aware of him or herself during both of these instances, but is not aware during the stages of sleep when the prefrontal cortex is shut down, it seems logical that the I-function is located within this region. This indicates that the I-function is what is resting and regenerating during the first stage of sleep. It would be interesting to study prefrontal cortex activity while a person is conscious, but unaware of his or her actions, due to an influence such as drugs or alcohol. According to the results of the sleep deprivation studies little or no activity should be seen in the prefrontal cortex at anytime when the individual is unaware of his or herself.


Sleep Deprivation and Depression: What's the Link?

Sleep deprivation: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
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Sleep deprivation is a commonplace occurrence in modern culture. Every day there seems to be twice as much work and half as much time to complete it in. This results in either extended periods of wakefulness or a decrease in sleep over an extended period of time. While some people may like to believe that they can train their bodies to not require as much sleep as they once did this belief is false . Sleep is needed to regenerate certain parts of the body, especially the brain, so that it may continue to function optimally. After periods of extended wakefulness or reduced sleep neurons may begin to malfunction, visibly effecting a person's behavior. Some organs, such as muscles, are able to regenerate even when a person is not sleeping so long as they are resting. This could involve lying awake but relaxed within a quite environment. Even though cognitive functions might not seem necessary in this scenario the brain, especially the cerebral cortex, is not able to rest but rather remains semi-alert in a state of "quiet readiness" . Certain stages of sleep are needed for the regeneration of neurons within the cerebral cortex while other stages of sleep seem to be used for forming new memories and generating new synaptic connections. The effects of sleep deprivation on behavior have been tested with relation to the presence of activity in different sections of the cerebral cortex.


The Heavy Effects Of Sleep Deprivation - What Happens …

Fatigue and sleeplessness are due to lifestyle choices. One of the common causes of sleep deprivation is drinking caffeine or alcohol before bedtime. Night shifts can change normal circadian patterns though it is unavoidable.

Insomnia & Older Adults - Insomnia - Sleep Foundation

Some health problems can create fatigue when it interferes with the sleep patterns in the body. Some physical health problems may make sleeping difficult. Asthma can do that to your sleep. Mental health problems like depression and post-traumatic stress disorder lead to insomnia. The three common sleeping disorders include narcolepsy, parasomnia and apnea. More than seventy different types of such cases exist and can pose serious health risks.