Smoking & Cardiovascular Disease (Heart Disease)

Arrhythmia: This is an abnormal rhythm of the heart. There are various types of arrhythmias. The heart can beat too slow, too fast or irregularly. Bradycardia is when the is less than 60 beats per minute. Tachycardia is when the heart rate is more than 100 beats per minute. An arrhythmia can affect how well the heart works. The heart may not be able to pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Learn more about .

Cardiovascular disease, heart disease and heart attack

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) take the lives of 17.7 million people every year, 31% of all global deaths. Triggering these diseases are tobacco smoking, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and the harmful use of alcohol. These in turn show up in people as raised blood pressure, elevated blood glucose and overweight and obesity. Through the Global Hearts Initiative, WHO is supporting governments to scale-up efforts on CVD prevention and control through three technical packages: MPOWER for tobacco control, SHAKE for salt reduction and HEARTS for strengthening CVD management in primary health care. Launched in September 2016, the initiative has been rolled out in several countries, where health workers are being trained to better deliver tested and affordable measures to protect people from CVDs and help them recover following a heart attack or stroke. A new global initiative - Resolve to Save Lives - will give renewed impetus to these efforts.


What Happens During a Heart Attack: Signs, Symptoms and …

Calculates ASCVD risk for heart disease and stroke using the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines

A occurs when the blood flow to a part of the heart is blocked by a blood clot. If this clot cuts off the blood flow completely, the part of the heart muscle supplied by that artery begins to die. Most people survive their first heart attack and return to their normal lives to enjoy many more years of productive activity. But having a heart attack does mean you have to make some changes. The doctor will advise you of and according to how badly the heart was damaged and what degree of heart disease caused the heart attack. .


Heart disease prevention — Strategies you can ..

Women who smoke and use oral contraceptives greatly increase their risk of coronary heart disease and stroke compared with nonsmoking women who use oral contraceptives.

Cardiovascular risk of smoking and benefits of smoking ..

22 September, 2016: “Global Hearts”, a new initiative from the World Health Organization (WHO) and partners launched on the margins of the UN General Assembly, aims to beat back the global threat of cardiovascular disease, including heart attacks and strokes - the world’s leading cause of death.

Most cardiovascular diseases are preventable

Cigarette and tobacco smoke, , , physical inactivity, and are the six major independent risk factors for that you can modify or control.

Cigarette smoking is so widespread and significant as a risk factor that the Surgeon General has called it "the leading preventable cause of disease and deaths in the United States."Cigarette smoking increases the risk of coronary heart disease by itself. When it acts with other factors, it greatly increases risk. Smoking increases blood pressure, decreases exercise tolerance and increases the tendency for blood to clot. Smoking also increases the risk of recurrent coronary heart disease after bypass surgery.Cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for young men and women. It produces a greater relative risk in persons under age 50 than in those over 50.Women who smoke and use oral contraceptives greatly increase their risk of coronary heart disease and stroke compared with nonsmoking women who use oral contraceptives.Smoking decreases . Cigarette smoking combined with a family history of heart disease also seems to greatly increase the risk

Exercise and Cardiovascular Health | Circulation

Heart and blood vessel disease — also called — includes numerous problems, many of which are related to a process called . Atherosclerosis is a condition that develops when a substance called plaque builds up in the walls of the arteries. This buildup narrows the arteries, making it harder for blood to flow through. If a blood clot forms, it can stop the blood flow. This can cause a heart attack or stroke.